A secret door

hidden door video stillSomeone has hidden an exterior door beneath the siding on their house. A water spigot serves as a door handle, and a keypad lock is hidden behind a panel. (See short video below.)

I don’t know what the point of this is, but isn’t it cool?

I’ve long been fascinated with hidden doors. There’s just something about them. Something archetypal.

The word “archetype” dates to the sixteenth century, but the psychiatrist Carl Jung gave it its modern meaning. Today it refers to an idea or concept that’s deeply rooted in the experience of the human race, and which is said to be present in each individual’s unconscious mind.

I sometimes have dreams of finding hidden rooms in a house (sometimes it’s the house where I grew up). These rooms don’t exist in real life, and don’t make a bit of architectural sense — a second basement below the first, or rooms that are larger on the inside than they are on the outside —- but within dream logic they seem plausible and correct.

Dream interpretation probably says more about the interpreter than it does about what’s being interpreted, but it’s not a stretch to see the hidden door and hidden room motif as a metaphor of self-discovery. Maybe it’s something you know, but you don’t know that you know it. Or some part of yourself, but you don’t know it’s you… yet.

But concealing an outside door on your house? That’s pretty weird and maybe even paranoid, though in this case proudly posting a demonstration on YouTube probably rules out paranoia. This door looks like it was made for fun, a way of creating a bit of secret knowledge to share. There are few things more intimate than sharing a secret. Like a door, a secret isn’t just to keep others out but also to let them in.

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5 thoughts on “A secret door

  1. Melinda

    I grew up in an old house with a door in the utility room that revealed a built-in ironing board. I constantly thought about the alternative world that existed on the other side of that door.

    Reply
  2. Pingback: Neil Gaiman reads “Instructions” for entering a fairy-tale world | The Curious People

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